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Like An Old Dream -- Bingham, Illinois "I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering...
Like An Old Dream -- Bingham, Illinois
"I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long lost, like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream, like a piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of all like golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all the living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a million years ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by their own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling."
—Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums

A tiny duo of mushrooms on the side of a fallen tree in southern Illinois...

#FungusFriday
Somewhere Between Twilight And Dreaming -- Fort Collins, Colorado "Carry the spirit of a child. Just...
Somewhere Between Twilight And Dreaming -- Fort Collins, Colorado
"Carry the spirit of a child. Just keep getting really excited about things and see the world as massive and unending in inspiration, color, and dreams, and spread those sparks around so everyone is on fire too because wonder is a contagious burning thing that fuels adulthood like the slingshot of a arrow."
~Victoria Erickson

A large bloom of Veitch's Blue ( Echinops ritro ) at sunset in the CSU Annual Trial garden in Fort Collins...
Lost Treasure -- Fort Collins, Colorado “Not a single bee has ever sent you an invoice. And that is ...
Lost Treasure -- Fort Collins, Colorado
“Not a single bee has ever sent you an invoice. And that is part of the problem – because most of what comes to us from nature is free, because it is not invoiced, because it is not priced, because it is not traded in markets, we tend to ignore it.”
-- Pavan Sukhdev

A honeybee gathers pollen from the tiny flowers of a pink sedum plant in northern Colorado this past summer...
Escape From Totality -- Glendo, Wyoming The total solar eclipse of 2017 in North America as seen from...
Escape From Totality -- Glendo, Wyoming
The total solar eclipse of 2017 in North America as seen from the vicinity of Glendo, Wyoming yesterday... This was taken just a few seconds after totality had ended, as the first burst of rays appeared over the edge of the moon. Totality itself was an incredible experience, but I thought the first few seconds just past totality were the most photographically interesting , because there's simply more going on, visually. You can even see a few solar flares in the 12 to 3 o'clock position.

It was amazing how instantly the entire experience changed between 99% totality and 100% totality. You knew the very instant that complete totality had been reached because it was literally as if someone had just flipped the light switch off, and everything changed from pseudo-daylight to pre-dawn in an instant, with the exception that the entire horizon (all 360º of it) glowed with a pre-dawn glow rather than just the eastern horizon. Crickets started chirping. The temperature dropped noticeably. The wind stopped. And it was altogether one of the most surreal experiences I've ever had. My only regret was that it was all so brief and rushed - my fingers were flying trying to find the best combination of camera settings and take as many photos as possible, and I was also doing my darnedest to just experience it as well. I was able to do both, but not with the leisure or calm I would've liked. Totality only lasted for 2 minutes and 27 seconds from my location.

At any rate, if you've never experienced a total eclipse, then it's totally worth doing so if you ever have the opportunity (no pun intended). :-)

#eclipse #eclipse2017 #solareclipse #totality #totallyawesome #solarflares
Super Full Cold Moon -- Fort Collins, Colorado Taken from my backyard around 7:30 p.m. Mountain (MST...
Super Full Cold Moon -- Fort Collins, Colorado
Taken from my backyard around 7:30 p.m. Mountain (MST) tonight, this is the last super moon of 2017. It's also known as the "Full Cold Moon".

A supermoon happens when the full moon coincides with the moon's closest approach to Earth in its orbit. Supermoons make the moon appear a little brighter and closer than normal, although the difference is hard to spot with the naked eye. The term "supermoon" has only been used in the past 40 years, but it received a slew of attention in late 2016 when three supermoons occurred in a row. The supermoon of November 2016 was also the closest supermoon in 69 years, although a closer supermoon will rise in the 2030s. Also, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac, the name of the full moon in December is "Full Cold Moon," and given the weather in December (at least in the Northern Hemisphere), that's not a surprise. :)

Some information courtesy of Space.com
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